Department History
Mundelein Fire Department History

When the Village was incorporated in 1909 it had no fire
department, but it did have firefighting equipment which
consisted of 24 metal buckets and 3 wooden ladders. Eventually
the Village put its first well in and ran water mains, when they
did this a firefighting hose cart was purchased along with 600 feet
of 2 ½” fire hose; it arrived at the beginning of October 1915.
Then on October 28th a barn fire occurred on Lake Street,
residents grabbed the hose cart and connected it to the new fire
hydrants and extinguished the barn fire. The mayor at the time
stated that a fire department needed to be established and called
for a meeting on November 5, 1915 for the purpose of
organizing a fire department. That night 24 volunteers came out
to join the department and elected Horace King as the first Fire
Chief, the following Monday November 8th the new fire
department held its first training secession.
1915 Hose Cart, purchased with 600' of hose and two nozzles for $485.00,
this cart is on display at the Fort Hill Museu
m
In December 1924 the Soo Line Railroad met with Village
officials and asked them to consider changing the name of the
Villlage once more. The official agreed to make the final name
change to Mundelein, which was the name of the Arch Bishop of
Chicago, Cardinal George Mundelein. The Cardinal was so
greatful that the Village honored him, he purchased a fire truck.
as a token of appreciation. Father Wolf and a committee of
firemen came up with specifications and a Stoughton Fire Truck
was purchased at a cost of $6,700.00 from Stoughton
Wagonworks in Stoughton Wisconsin. In July 1925 it was
originally delivered to the Chicago Fire Department, which
tested it at Navy Pier. After testing took place a large ceremony
took place at the St. Mary of the Lake Seminary, which is located
in Mundelein, part of the ceremony was a demonstration of the
engine by members of the Chicago Fire Department
July 1925 members of the Chicago Fire Department test Mundelein's first
fire engine at Navy Pier
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At this time the Village's fire equipment was stored in the Village Hall on
Chicago Avenue and anywhere else they could find space. In 1928 a
referendum was passed to build a new Village Hall, land was donated on
Hawley Street. The new Village Hall housed the fire department, police
department and had an office for the Mayor and the upstairs was used for
meetings.
In 1929 the new Village Hall was dedicated it housed the fire department
and police department. This is still the Village Hall today although an
addition was added in the 1970's and they are currently building a new one.
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The horse drawn steamer above was with a department for an unknown
time, the rumor is that it was donated. It is pictured in the upper photo in a
parade on Lake Street. It was photographed in a parade in Waukegan the
New Sun states in the photo caption that it was the last horse drawn steamer
from Chicago Fire Department.

In 1935 Village Ordinance 247 was passed creating the fire department as
an official department of the Village. The Fire Chief received an annual
salary of $50.00 and the Assistant Chief received $10.00 the firefighters
received $1.00 per call.

In 1939 the Village of Mundelein assisted in creating the Countryside Fire
Protection District, up until this time the Mundelein Fire Department
would respond to calls outside Village boundries and charge the residents
for the response. At this time the Department was known as the Mundelein
Countryside Fire Department equipment was stored wherever they could
find room. Then in 1947 land was purchased on Seymour Avenue for $1.00
from A.C  Kracklauer to build a new fire station. The station would be a
four bay station with an office.

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Above the station on Seymour is under construction the station was built
by members of the department and serviced as the Village's only station
until 2000. It would undergo two more additions one to add an upstairs and
another to add additional apparatus bays

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"Serving Our Community, With Professionalism, Integrity, and Pride"